HealthStats NSW
HealthStats NSW
HealthStats NSW

High body mass attributable deaths

Sydney, 2016
32.4Sydney, 2015
35.7Sydney, 2014
35.9Sydney, 2013
37.9Sydney, 2012
40.8Sydney, 2011
43.6Sydney, 2010
39.3Sydney, 2009
44.7Sydney, 2008
50.3Sydney, 2007
49.6Sydney, 2006
48.1Sydney, 2005
53.6Sydney, 2004
59.8Sydney, 2003
60.7Sydney, 2002
60.6Sydney, 2001
65.2South Western Sydney, 2016
40.6South Western Sydney, 2015
44.4South Western Sydney, 2014
46.5South Western Sydney, 2013
44.5South Western Sydney, 2012
46.4South Western Sydney, 2011
48.4South Western Sydney, 2010
47South Western Sydney, 2009
50.9South Western Sydney, 2008
57.2South Western Sydney, 2007
54.2South Western Sydney, 2006
54.5South Western Sydney, 2005
55South Western Sydney, 2004
60.5South Western Sydney, 2003
62.9South Western Sydney, 2002
67.9South Western Sydney, 2001
65.8South Eastern Sydney, 2016
32.1South Eastern Sydney, 2015
34.4South Eastern Sydney, 2014
34.9South Eastern Sydney, 2013
34.8South Eastern Sydney, 2012
35.3South Eastern Sydney, 2011
37South Eastern Sydney, 2010
36.7South Eastern Sydney, 2009
40.9South Eastern Sydney, 2008
43.5South Eastern Sydney, 2007
43.1South Eastern Sydney, 2006
42.5South Eastern Sydney, 2005
43.9South Eastern Sydney, 2004
47.5South Eastern Sydney, 2003
50South Eastern Sydney, 2002
51.8South Eastern Sydney, 2001
52.8Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2016
41.3Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2015
44Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2014
42.1Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2013
41.7Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2012
45.8Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2011
47.4Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2010
45.7Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2009
51.4Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2008
53.3Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2007
54Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2006
55.5Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2005
54.5Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2004
57.4Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2003
64.9Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2002
63Illawarra Shoalhaven, 2001
60.5Western Sydney, 2016
41.8Western Sydney, 2015
43.2Western Sydney, 2014
41.6Western Sydney, 2013
41.4Western Sydney, 2012
44.7Western Sydney, 2011
46.8Western Sydney, 2010
48.7Western Sydney, 2009
50Western Sydney, 2008
55.2Western Sydney, 2007
55Western Sydney, 2006
55.1Western Sydney, 2005
56.8Western Sydney, 2004
60.5Western Sydney, 2003
60Western Sydney, 2002
68.2Western Sydney, 2001
67.2Nepean Blue Mountains, 2016
46.6Nepean Blue Mountains, 2015
44.1Nepean Blue Mountains, 2014
44.5Nepean Blue Mountains, 2013
44.1Nepean Blue Mountains, 2012
48Nepean Blue Mountains, 2011
46.8Nepean Blue Mountains, 2010
50.7Nepean Blue Mountains, 2009
51.3Nepean Blue Mountains, 2008
55.8Nepean Blue Mountains, 2007
58Nepean Blue Mountains, 2006
53.6Nepean Blue Mountains, 2005
61.3Nepean Blue Mountains, 2004
65.4Nepean Blue Mountains, 2003
59.7Nepean Blue Mountains, 2002
63Nepean Blue Mountains, 2001
72.5Northern Sydney, 2016
28.8Northern Sydney, 2015
28.6Northern Sydney, 2014
28.9Northern Sydney, 2013
30Northern Sydney, 2012
32.2Northern Sydney, 2011
33.2Northern Sydney, 2010
35.6Northern Sydney, 2009
37.3Northern Sydney, 2008
38.8Northern Sydney, 2007
40.3Northern Sydney, 2006
40.6Northern Sydney, 2005
41.5Northern Sydney, 2004
44.7Northern Sydney, 2003
45.9Northern Sydney, 2002
48.4Northern Sydney, 2001
48.3Central Coast, 2016
41.5Central Coast, 2015
41.7Central Coast, 2014
41.8Central Coast, 2013
41Central Coast, 2012
41.2Central Coast, 2011
44Central Coast, 2010
44.7Central Coast, 2009
50.5Central Coast, 2008
50Central Coast, 2007
49.2Central Coast, 2006
53.6Central Coast, 2005
55.2Central Coast, 2004
57.4Central Coast, 2003
59.2Central Coast, 2002
62.5Central Coast, 2001
61.6Hunter New England, 2016
45.8Hunter New England, 2015
47.2Hunter New England, 2014
49.7Hunter New England, 2013
46.8Hunter New England, 2012
49.7Hunter New England, 2011
52.6Hunter New England, 2010
50.3Hunter New England, 2009
55Hunter New England, 2008
58.6Hunter New England, 2007
60.3Hunter New England, 2006
58.2Hunter New England, 2005
58.3Hunter New England, 2004
62.4Hunter New England, 2003
64.4Hunter New England, 2002
65.9Hunter New England, 2001
67.4Northern NSW, 2016
43.3Northern NSW, 2015
43.8Northern NSW, 2014
43.3Northern NSW, 2013
41.8Northern NSW, 2012
46.5Northern NSW, 2011
48.6Northern NSW, 2010
46.1Northern NSW, 2009
50.1Northern NSW, 2008
52.1Northern NSW, 2007
54Northern NSW, 2006
52.5Northern NSW, 2005
51.4Northern NSW, 2004
59.3Northern NSW, 2003
56.8Northern NSW, 2002
62.5Northern NSW, 2001
58.7Mid North Coast, 2016
44.4Mid North Coast, 2015
38.9Mid North Coast, 2014
40Mid North Coast, 2013
41.2Mid North Coast, 2012
45.3Mid North Coast, 2011
43.9Mid North Coast, 2010
44.1Mid North Coast, 2009
47.4Mid North Coast, 2008
50.6Mid North Coast, 2007
54.6Mid North Coast, 2006
48.8Mid North Coast, 2005
53.1Mid North Coast, 2004
52.4Mid North Coast, 2003
56.7Mid North Coast, 2002
63.5Mid North Coast, 2001
60.8Southern NSW, 2016
44.4Southern NSW, 2015
45.4Southern NSW, 2014
44.9Southern NSW, 2013
43.8Southern NSW, 2012
46.5Southern NSW, 2011
52.9Southern NSW, 2010
51.9Southern NSW, 2009
54.8Southern NSW, 2008
56.5Southern NSW, 2007
60.3Southern NSW, 2006
55.9Southern NSW, 2005
58.1Southern NSW, 2004
64.6Southern NSW, 2003
66.8Southern NSW, 2002
64Southern NSW, 2001
67Murrumbidgee, 2016
46.7Murrumbidgee, 2015
45.2Murrumbidgee, 2014
44.2Murrumbidgee, 2013
51.9Murrumbidgee, 2012
50.6Murrumbidgee, 2011
56Murrumbidgee, 2010
49.2Murrumbidgee, 2009
58.4Murrumbidgee, 2008
59.6Murrumbidgee, 2007
60.8Murrumbidgee, 2006
58.4Murrumbidgee, 2005
59.6Murrumbidgee, 2004
63.3Murrumbidgee, 2003
66.2Murrumbidgee, 2002
71.8Murrumbidgee, 2001
71.6Western NSW, 2016
48.4Western NSW, 2015
50.5Western NSW, 2014
53Western NSW, 2013
49.4Western NSW, 2012
59.2Western NSW, 2011
59.2Western NSW, 2010
62.4Western NSW, 2009
60.7Western NSW, 2008
63.4Western NSW, 2007
65.9Western NSW, 2006
67Western NSW, 2005
68.8Western NSW, 2004
71.2Western NSW, 2003
75.4Western NSW, 2002
75.1Western NSW, 2001
78.4Far West, 2016
50.9Far West, 2015
59.1Far West, 2014
56.4Far West, 2013
54.1Far West, 2012
55.6Far West, 2011
49.7Far West, 2010
66.4Far West, 2009
64.6Far West, 2008
53.7Far West, 2007
57.4Far West, 2006
79.1Far West, 2005
62.5Far West, 2004
76.7Far West, 2003
84.1Far West, 2002
77.1Far West, 2001
78.9All LHDs, 2016
39.4All LHDs, 2015
40.7All LHDs, 2014
41.2All LHDs, 2013
41All LHDs, 2012
43.7All LHDs, 2011
45.6All LHDs, 2010
45.4All LHDs, 2009
48.8All LHDs, 2008
51.9All LHDs, 2007
52.5All LHDs, 2006
51.9All LHDs, 2005
53.3All LHDs, 2004
57.3All LHDs, 2003
59.1All LHDs, 2002
61.8All LHDs, 2001
62.2
  • + Source

    Mortality estimates for years up to 2005 are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics death registration data. Data from 2006 onwards were provided by the Australian Coordinating Registry, Cause of Death Unit Record File; the data for the most 2 recent years are preliminary (SAPHaRI, Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health)

  • + Notes

    Body Mass Index (BMI)= weight(kg)/height²(m).

    Calculated using age and sex-specific aetiological fractions from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011: methods and supplementary information.

    Only NSW residents are included. Deaths were classified using ICD-10. Rates were age-adjusted using the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.

    Counts of deaths for the latest years of data include an estimate of the number of deaths occurring in that year but registered in the next year. Data on late registrations were unavailable at the time of production.

    LL/UL 95%CI = lower and upper limits of the 95% confidence interval for the point estimate.

  • + Data Table
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  • + Methods
  • + Codes
    • Codes for Population Attributable Conditions: High BMI

      Mortality: High Body Mass Index (BMI) attributable conditions

      Condition ICD10 (AM) codes
      PARTIALLY ATTRIBUTABLE CONDITIONS
      Malignant Neoplasms
      Oesophageal cancer C15
      Bowel cancer C18-C20
      Gallbladder cancer C23-C24
      Pancreatic cancer C25
      Breast cancer C50
      Uterine cancer C54-C55
      Kidney cancer C64
      Diabetes mellitus
      Diabetes E10-E14 , O24
      Cardiovascular disease
      Coronary heart disease I20-I25
      Stroke I60-I69
      Hypertensive heart disease I11
      Atrial fibrillation and flutter I48
      Inflammatory heart disease I30-I33, I40-I41
      Cardiomyopathy I42-I43
      Peripheral vascular disease I70, I72-I74
      Other cardiovascular diseases G45, I00, I10, I13-I15, I26-I28, I44-I47, I49-I52, I70.9, I77-I84, I86-I89, I95-I99
      Kidney disease
      Chronic kidney disease E10-E14, I12, N02-N08, N11-N16, N18, N39, Q61

      Note: ICD codes have been summarised. Numbers are calculated using age and sex-specific population attributable fractions from the Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011: methods and supplementary information. For information on how these were applied in HealthStats NSW please see the Methods paper on Population Attributable Fractions.

  • + Related Indicators
  • + Associated Information
    • Key points: Overweight and obesity

      Latest available information

      Latest available data for adults in NSW

        • 54.2% of adults aged 16 years and over (61.3% of men and 47.2% of women) were overweight or obese as estimated from the 2018 NSW Population Health Survey (self-reported using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing or CATI).

        • 65.9% of persons aged 18 years and over (73.9% of males and 58.0% of females) in NSW were overweight or obese as estimated from the 2017-18 National Health Survey (interviewer-administered questionnaire and measured weight and height). This survey also showed that 59.7% of males and 63.8% of females were at either increased or substantially increased risk of health problems associated with overweight or obesity as measured by waist circumference.

      Latest available data for school students in NSW

        • 20.6% of students aged 12-17 years (23.4% of boys and 17.7% of girls) were overweight or obese as estimated from the 2017 NSW School Students Health Behaviours Survey (self-completed questionnaire).

        • 24.5% of students in years K, 2, 4, 6 and 10 (22.9% of primary school students and 27.5% of secondary school students) were overweight or obese as estimated from the 2015 NSW Schools Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey (measured).

      Latest available data for children in NSW

        • 24.0% of children aged 5-16 years in NSW (26.5% of boys and 21.3% of girls) were overweight or obese as estimated from the 2018 NSW Population Health Survey (self-reported using Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing or CATI).

        • 25.6% of children aged 5-17 years in NSW (26.1% of boys and 26.2% of girls) were overweight or obese as estimated from the 2017-18 National  Health Survey (measured).

      Latest available data for adult Aboriginal persons in NSW

        • 72.7% of Aboriginal adults aged 16 years and over were overweight or obese compared with 53.8% of non-Aboriginal adults in NSW as estimated from the 2018 NSW Adult Population Health Survey (self-reported using CATI). The trend in rates of overweight and obesity are consistently higher for Aboriginal peoples. This appears to be driven by higher rates of obesity rather than overweight rates over time among Aboriginal compared with non-Aboriginal peoples. 

      Overall trends in NSW

      Self-reported data on overweight and obesity have been collected for adults in NSW since 1997 through the NSW Population Health Survey and since 1977-78 through the Australian Health Surveys, National Health Surveys (from 1995). Measured data on overweight and obesity have been collected for adults in NSW through the National Nutrition Survey (1995) and the Australian and National Health Survey (2011-12 and 2007-08 respectively).

      Self-reported data on overweight and obesity have been collected for students in NSW since 2005 through the NSW School Students Health Behaviours Survey and measured data on overweight and obesity have been collected for students in NSW since 1985 through the Australian Health and Fitness Survey and the Australian Health Survey and the NSW Schools Fitness and Physical Activity Survey (1997) and the NSW Schools Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey (SPANS) (2004, 2010 and 2015).

      Parent-reported data on overweight and obesity have been collected for children in NSW since 2007 through the NSW Population Health Survey. Measured data on overweight and obesity have been collected for children in NSW since 2008 through the Australian Health Survey.

      Prevalence estimates, although differing slightly between surveys because of different sampling frames, participation rates and modes of collection (telephone versus self-completed questionnaires versus face-to-face personal interview versus measured) have shown that rates have been stabilising in recent years. 

      Hospitalisations attributable to high body mass

      A total of 66,869 hospitalisations were attributed to high body mass in NSW in 2017-18, which was approximately 2.2% of all hospitalisations. The rate of hospitalisation decreased by approximately 12.5% between 2010-11 and 2017-18.

      Deaths attributable to high body mass

      A total of 3,758 deaths were estimated to be caused by high body mass in NSW in 2017, which was approximately 7.1% of all deaths. The rate of death attributed to high body mass decreased in the decade up to 2017.

      References

      Australian Bureau of Statistics. National Health Survey. Available at: http://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/Lookup/4364.0.55.001Main+Features100012017-18?OpenDocument

      Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence. NSW Population Health Surveys. NSW Ministry of Health. Available at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/surveys/Pages/default.aspx

      University of Sydney. NSW Schools Physical Activity and Nutrition Survey. Information available at: http://ses.library.usyd.edu.au/handle/2123/9091

    • Introduction: Overweight and obesity

      High body weight as a health risk factor

      There are health problems associated with being either underweight or overweight. Although underweight can be a serious risk to health (leading to malnutrition and other health problems such as osteoporosis), public health focus is on excess body weight, as this is a much greater problem in the Australian population.

      Excess weight, especially obesity, is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease, Type 2 diabetes, some musculoskeletal conditions and some cancers. As the level of excess weight increases, so does the risk of developing these conditions. In addition, being overweight can hamper the ability to control or manage chronic disorders.

      Excess weight in children increases the risk of poor health, both during childhood and later in adulthood. Children who are overweight or obese are at greater risk of developing chronic conditions such as asthma and Type 2 diabetes and may experience negative social and mental wellbeing.

      Body Mass Index (BMI)

      High and low body weight categories are determined using Body Mass Index (BMI). BMI is calculated by a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of their height in metres (kg/m2). A person considered overweight or obese has a BMI of at least 25 kg/m2. For more details on the BMI, see the Methods section.

      For persons aged 18 years and over, the body weight categories are: underweight (BMI less than 18.5), healthy weight (BMI from 18.5 to 24.9), overweight (BMI from 25.0 to 29.9) and obese (BMI of 30.0 and over). Obesity was further classified into: Obesity Class I (BMI between 30.0 and 34.9), Obesity Class II (BMI between 35.0 and 39.9) and Obesity Class III (BMI of 40.0 or over).

      For children and adolescents, while the same categories to describe body weight are used, the BMI range for each category varies by individual year of age of the child and is different for boys and girls. These category ranges comply with an international standard (Cole et al. 2000; Cole et al. 2007).

      High body weight interventions

      The NSW Healthy Eating and Active Living Strategy 2013-2018 provides a whole of government framework to promote and support healthy eating and active living in NSW and to reduce the impact of lifestyle-related chronic disease.

      The Strategy has four key strategic directions:

      • environments to support healthy eating and active living

      • state-wide healthy eating and active living support programs

      • healthy eating and active living advice as part of routine service delivery

      • education and information to enable informed, healthy choices.

      Useful websites

      8700 Find Your Ideal Figure. Available at http://www.8700.com.au/

      Australian Bureau of Statistics at http://www.abs.gov.au

      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare at http://www.aihw.gov.au

      Cole T, Bellizzi M, Flegal K, Dietz W. Establishing a standard definition for child overweight and obesity worldwide: International survey. British Medical Journal 2000; 320. Available at http://www.bmj.com/content/320/7244/1240 (accessed 12 January 2016).

      Cole Y, Flegal K, Nicholls D, Jackson A. Body mass index cut offs to define thinness in children and adolescents: International survey. British Medical Journal 2007; 335(7612): 194. Available at http://www.bmj.com/content/335/7612/194 (accessed 12 January 2016).

      Get Healthy Information and Coaching Service. Available at http://www.gethealthynsw.com.au/

      Healthdirect at http://www.healthdirect.gov.au

      Healthy Eating Active Living. Available at http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/heal/pages/default.aspx

      Healthy Kids, a collaboration between the NSW Ministry of Health, Department of Eduction and Training and the Heart Foundation. Available at http://www.healthykids.nsw.gov.au/default.aspx  

      Make Healthy Normal. Available at https://www.makehealthynormal.nsw.gov.au/

      National Health and Medical Research Council. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity in adults, adolescents and children in Australia. Melbourne: National Health and Medical Research Council, 2013. Available at https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines-publications/n57

    • Interventions: Preventive health

      The NSW Healthy Eating and Active Living Strategy 2013-2018 provides a whole of government framework to promote and support healthy eating and active living in NSW and to reduce the impact of lifestyle-related chronic disease.

      The Strategy has four key strategic directions:

      • • environments to support healthy eating and active living
      • • statewide healthy eating and active living support programs
      • • healthy eating and active living advice as part of routine service delivery
      • • education and information to enable informed, healthy choices.
    • For more information: Overweight and obesity

      Useful websites include:

      Australian Bureau of Statistics at http://www.abs.gov.au

      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare at http://www.aihw.gov.au

      healthdirect at http://www.healthdirect.gov.au

      National Health and Medical Research Council. Clinical practice guidelines for the management of overweight and obesity in adults, adolescents and children in Australia. Melbourne: National Health and Medical Research Council, 2013. Available at: https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/guidelines-publications/n57

      NSW Department of Education and Training and NSW Ministry of Health. Live Life Well @ School. NSW Department of Education and Training & NSW Ministry of Health website. Available at: http://www.healthykids.nsw.gov.au/teachers-childcare/live-life-well-@-school.aspx/index.htm

      NSW Government. Good for kids. Good for life. Available at: http://www.goodforkids.nsw.gov.au/parents-carers

      NSW Government: NSW Ministry of Health, NSW Department of Education and Training, Sport and Recreation, a division of Communities NSW and the Heart Foundation. Munch and Move. NSW Government website. Available at: http://www.healthykids.nsw.gov.au/campaigns-programs/about-munch-move.aspx

      NSW Ministry of Health. Healthy Eating Active Living. Available at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/heal/pages/default.aspx.

Last Updated At: Tuesday, 29 October 2019