HealthStats NSW

Smoking attributable hospitalisations

Females, Total
413.9 (407.8, 420)Females, Very remote
1401 (1066, 1807.4)Females, Remote
1041.3 (892.5, 1207.7)Females, Outer regional
556.1 (528.9, 584.4)Females, Inner regional
477.8 (463.4, 492.4)Females, Major cities
375.9 (369, 382.9)Males, Total
692.1 (684, 700.3)Males, Very remote
972 (690.7, 1323.8)Males, Remote
1353.1 (1193.8, 1527.4)Males, Outer regional
912.9 (878.2, 948.5)Males, Inner regional
758.5 (740.3, 777.1)Males, Major cities
640.9 (631.6, 650.4)
  • + Source

    NSW Combined Admitted Patient Epidemiology Data and ABS population estimates (SAPHaRI). Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health.

  • + Notes

    Calculated using age and sex-specific aetiological fractions from the School of Population Health, University of Queensland and AIHW, 2007.

    Only NSW residents are included. Figures are based on where a person resides, not where they are treated. Hospital separations were classified using ICD-10-AM. Rates were age-adjusted using the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.

    Numbers for the two latest years include an estimate of the small number of hospitalisations of NSW residents in interstate public hospitals, data for which were unavailable at the time of production. LL/UL 95%CI = lower and upper limits of the 95% confidence interval for the point estimate. Statistical Local Areas are grouped according to Australian Standard Geographical Classification (ASGC) remoteness categories on the basis of Accessibility/Remoteness Index for Australia (ARIA+ version) score.

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  • + Methods
  • + Codes
    • Codes: Aetiologic fractions

      The disease and injury groupings used in the analysis of aetiologic fractions were defined using coding developed for the Burden of disease study (BOD) with a mapping to ICD-10-AM codes (Begg et al. 2007). These resources were provided by the School of Population Health, University of Queensland directly to the Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence.

      Refer to the Methods tab for more information on aetiologic fractions methodology.

      References

      Begg S, Vos T, Barker B. The burden of disease and injury in Australia, 2003. Cat. no. PHE 82 edition. Canberra: AIHW, 2007. http://www.aihw.gov.au/publication-detail/?id=6442467990

  • + Related Indicators
     

    Smoking attributable deaths

    Number and rate by sex, Local Health District, Medicare Local, Local Government Area, remoteness from service centres, socioeconomic status and year.
     
     

    Quality of reporting of Aboriginality in hospital data

    Number and proportion of observed and expected admissions to hospital by Local Health District of hospital, hospital and year.
     
  • + Associated Information
    • Key points: Smoking

      Latest available information

      Latest available data for adults in NSW

        •  15.4% of persons aged 15 years and over (18.8% of males and 12.1% of females) in NSW were current smokers (defined as daily, at least once a week or less than weekly), as estimated from the 2014-15 Australian Health Survey (interviewer-administered questionnaire).

        • 9.3% of mothers smoked during pregnancy in 2014, as reported to the NSW Perinatal Data Collection.

      Latest available data for secondary school students in NSW

        • 6.7% of students aged 12-17 years (7.1% of boys and 6.3% of girls) were current smokers, as estimated from the 2014 NSW School Students Health Behaviours Survey (self-completed questionnaire).

      Latest available data for adult Aboriginal persons in NSW

        • 45.2% of Aboriginal mothers smoked during pregnancy in 2014, as reported to the NSW Perinatal Data Collection.

      Overall trends in NSW

      Self-reported data on current smoking have been collected for adults in NSW since 1997 through the NSW Population Health Survey, since 1977-78 through the National Health Survey (from 1995), since 1985 through the National Drug Strategy Household Survey, and since 2011 through the Australian Health Survey.

      Self-reported data on current smoking have been collected for students in NSW since 1984 through the NSW School Students Health Behaviours Survey.

      Prevalence estimates, although differing slightly between surveys because of different sampling frames, participation rates and modes of collection (telephone, self-completed questionnaires, face-to-face personal interview and drop-and-collect) have all been decreasing over time.

      Hospitalisations attributable to smoking

      A total of 46,335 hospitalisations were attributed to smoking in NSW in 2013-14, which was approximately 1.6% of all hospitalisations.

      The rate of hospitalisations attributable to smoking decreased in males by almost 23% but remained stable in females in NSW between 2001-02 and 2013-14.

      The rate of hospitalisations attributable to smoking increased in both Aboriginal males and Aboriginal females in the period between 2001-02 and 2011-12. In recent years, the rates have remained stable.

      Deaths attributable to smoking

      A total of 5,460 deaths were attributed to smoking in NSW in 2013, which was approximately 11.1% of all deaths in 2012.

      The rate of death attributable to smoking has been declining in the decade up to 2013; the decline was much greater in males (about 32%) than in females (about 17%) but it occurred from a much higher base in males. In 2013, the rate of death attributable to smoking in males and females were 85.3 and 40.7 deaths per 100,000 population, respectively .

      References

      Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health. NSW Population Health Surveys. Available at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/surveys/pages/default.aspx

      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. National Drug Strategy Household Survey report. Available at: http://www.aihw.gov.au/alcohol-and-other-drugs/ndshs/

      Australian Bureau of Statistics. Australian Health Survey. Available at: http://www.abs.gov.au/australianhealthsurvey

    • Introduction: Smoking

      Smoking and health implications

      Tobacco smoking is the greatest single cause of premature death and is a leading preventable cause of chronic disease in New South Wales. It is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, a range of cancers, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, coronary heart disease and a variety of other diseases and conditions. Approximately one in five of all cancer deaths are due to tobacco smoking.

      There is a no safe level of exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke. In adults, breathing second-hand smoke can increase the risk of heart disease, lung cancer and other lung diseases. It can worsen the effects of existing illnesses such as asthma and bronchitis. For children, inhaling second-hand smoke is even more dangerous. Children are more likely to suffer health problems due to second-hand smoke such as bronchitis, pneumonia and asthma.

      Interventions 

      Australia has one of the most comprehensive tobacco control policies and programs in the world. The aim of the tobacco control programs in NSW is to contribute to a continuing reduction of smoking prevalence rates in the community.

      Information on NSW Health programs and policies is available at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/tobacco.

      Useful websites:

      Cancer Institute at: https://www.cancerinstitute.org.au/

      I Can Quit at http://www.icanquit.com.au

      NSW Ministry of Health, Tobacco and Smoking Control in NSW. Available at: http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/tobacco

      Quitline at http://www.quit.org.au/preparing-to-quit/choosing-best-way-to-quit/quitline

    • Interventions in NSW: Smoking

      Information on NSW Health programs and policies is available at http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/tobacco.

    • For more information: Smoking

      Useful websites include:

      Australian Bureau of Statistics at http://www.abs.gov.au

      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare at http://www.aihw.gov.au

      I Can Quit at http://www.icanquit.com.au

Last Updated At: Tuesday, 4 August 2015