HealthStats NSW
HealthStats NSW
HealthStats NSW

Circulatory disease deaths by disease type

0-44 years, 2015-2016
4.30-44 years, 2014-2015
4.80-44 years, 2013-2014
4.50-44 years, 2012-2013
4.80-44 years, 2011-2012
5.50-44 years, 2010-2011
5.50-44 years, 2009-2010
5.80-44 years, 2008-2009
6.10-44 years, 2007-2008
5.80-44 years, 2006-2007
5.90-44 years, 2005-2006
6.20-44 years, 2004-2005
5.90-44 years, 2003-2004
6.10-44 years, 2002-2003
6.30-44 years, 2001-2002
6.645-54 years, 2015-2016
41.545-54 years, 2014-2015
40.945-54 years, 2013-2014
41.645-54 years, 2012-2013
41.745-54 years, 2011-2012
41.345-54 years, 2010-2011
4245-54 years, 2009-2010
44.445-54 years, 2008-2009
47.745-54 years, 2007-2008
50.245-54 years, 2006-2007
50.345-54 years, 2005-2006
50.545-54 years, 2004-2005
51.145-54 years, 2003-2004
52.745-54 years, 2002-2003
55.545-54 years, 2001-2002
5855-59 years, 2015-2016
72.155-59 years, 2014-2015
73.255-59 years, 2013-2014
75.655-59 years, 2012-2013
74.555-59 years, 2011-2012
78.355-59 years, 2010-2011
84.755-59 years, 2009-2010
85.755-59 years, 2008-2009
92.355-59 years, 2007-2008
98.155-59 years, 2006-2007
94.655-59 years, 2005-2006
96.455-59 years, 2004-2005
105.955-59 years, 2003-2004
111.855-59 years, 2002-2003
119.155-59 years, 2001-2002
127.260-64 years, 2015-2016
120.560-64 years, 2014-2015
123.560-64 years, 2013-2014
123.860-64 years, 2012-2013
123.460-64 years, 2011-2012
134.660-64 years, 2010-2011
140.360-64 years, 2009-2010
137.360-64 years, 2008-2009
146.360-64 years, 2007-2008
160.560-64 years, 2006-2007
16560-64 years, 2005-2006
165.260-64 years, 2004-2005
181.160-64 years, 2003-2004
20360-64 years, 2002-2003
216.260-64 years, 2001-2002
226.865-69 years, 2015-2016
183.365-69 years, 2014-2015
189.165-69 years, 2013-2014
199.865-69 years, 2012-2013
213.565-69 years, 2011-2012
216.665-69 years, 2010-2011
220.565-69 years, 2009-2010
23265-69 years, 2008-2009
249.765-69 years, 2007-2008
271.365-69 years, 2006-2007
28265-69 years, 2005-2006
294.865-69 years, 2004-2005
325.765-69 years, 2003-2004
35165-69 years, 2002-2003
374.565-69 years, 2001-2002
406.870-74 years, 2015-2016
353.270-74 years, 2014-2015
363.670-74 years, 2013-2014
35770-74 years, 2012-2013
378.570-74 years, 2011-2012
406.270-74 years, 2010-2011
419.670-74 years, 2009-2010
45070-74 years, 2008-2009
497.970-74 years, 2007-2008
510.570-74 years, 2006-2007
52070-74 years, 2005-2006
546.270-74 years, 2004-2005
608.870-74 years, 2003-2004
683.770-74 years, 2002-2003
722.470-74 years, 2001-2002
759.575-79 years, 2015-2016
66875-79 years, 2014-2015
70375-79 years, 2013-2014
744.375-79 years, 2012-2013
759.675-79 years, 2011-2012
807.175-79 years, 2010-2011
854.975-79 years, 2009-2010
898.475-79 years, 2008-2009
994.475-79 years, 2007-2008
1077.675-79 years, 2006-2007
1115.475-79 years, 2005-2006
1154.375-79 years, 2004-2005
1233.275-79 years, 2003-2004
1336.875-79 years, 2002-2003
138875-79 years, 2001-2002
1429.380-84 years, 2015-2016
1513.480-84 years, 2014-2015
1615.280-84 years, 2013-2014
164980-84 years, 2012-2013
1696.380-84 years, 2011-2012
181180-84 years, 2010-2011
1862.880-84 years, 2009-2010
1956.780-84 years, 2008-2009
2128.180-84 years, 2007-2008
225280-84 years, 2006-2007
2314.780-84 years, 2005-2006
2394.380-84 years, 2004-2005
2524.780-84 years, 2003-2004
2665.280-84 years, 2002-2003
2823.580-84 years, 2001-2002
2936.685-89 years, 2015-2016
3402.785-89 years, 2014-2015
3557.985-89 years, 2013-2014
3665.185-89 years, 2012-2013
3762.385-89 years, 2011-2012
3909.285-89 years, 2010-2011
3975.185-89 years, 2009-2010
414985-89 years, 2008-2009
4490.485-89 years, 2007-2008
4659.185-89 years, 2006-2007
4765.585-89 years, 2005-2006
4915.685-89 years, 2004-2005
5157.485-89 years, 2003-2004
5451.785-89 years, 2002-2003
5720.185-89 years, 2001-2002
588390-94 years, 2015-2016
6898.190-94 years, 2014-2015
7362.590-94 years, 2013-2014
7431.990-94 years, 2012-2013
7554.190-94 years, 2011-2012
7931.390-94 years, 2010-2011
8265.890-94 years, 2009-2010
8592.890-94 years, 2008-2009
9213.890-94 years, 2007-2008
9360.990-94 years, 2006-2007
9153.590-94 years, 2005-2006
9202.690-94 years, 2004-2005
9694.790-94 years, 2003-2004
10180.390-94 years, 2002-2003
10254.290-94 years, 2001-2002
10167.395-99 years, 2015-2016
12237.395-99 years, 2014-2015
13357.195-99 years, 2013-2014
13283.495-99 years, 2012-2013
1347295-99 years, 2011-2012
14172.295-99 years, 2010-2011
14171.995-99 years, 2009-2010
14017.395-99 years, 2008-2009
14754.295-99 years, 2007-2008
15452.495-99 years, 2006-2007
15396.195-99 years, 2005-2006
14933.795-99 years, 2004-2005
14961.795-99 years, 2003-2004
15265.695-99 years, 2002-2003
15046.795-99 years, 2001-2002
14658.9100+ years, 2015-2016
26513.8100+ years, 2014-2015
24078.8100+ years, 2013-2014
21431.6100+ years, 2012-2013
19347.6100+ years, 2011-2012
20389.7100+ years, 2010-2011
22093100+ years, 2009-2010
22334.2100+ years, 2008-2009
22967.8100+ years, 2007-2008
22259.7100+ years, 2006-2007
22402.4100+ years, 2005-2006
21991.2100+ years, 2004-2005
19389.7100+ years, 2003-2004
19247.9100+ years, 2002-2003
20113.9100+ years, 2001-2002
17313.8All ages, 2015-2016
147.5All ages, 2014-2015
154.8All ages, 2013-2014
157.6All ages, 2012-2013
161.3All ages, 2011-2012
169.9All ages, 2010-2011
175.3All ages, 2009-2010
182.6All ages, 2008-2009
197.6All ages, 2007-2008
206.8All ages, 2006-2007
209.8All ages, 2005-2006
215All ages, 2004-2005
227.2All ages, 2003-2004
241.9All ages, 2002-2003
252.2All ages, 2001-2002
259.5
  • + Source

    Mortality estimates for years up to 2005 are based on Australian Bureau of Statistics death registration data. Data from 2006 onwards were provided by the Australian Coordinating Registry, Cause of Death Unit Record File; the data for the most 2 recent years are preliminary (SAPHaRI, Centre for Epidemiology and Evidence, NSW Ministry of Health)

  • + Notes

    Only NSW residents are included. Deaths were classified using ICD-10. Rates were age-adjusted using the Australian population as at 30 June 2001.

    Counts of deaths in 2007 and following years include an estimate of the number of NSW residents who died interstate and counts for the latest year of data include an estimate of the number of deaths occurring in that year but registered in the next year. Data on interstate deaths and late registrations were unavailable at the time of production.

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  • + Methods
  • + Codes
    • Codes: Cardiovascular diseases

      The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems

      National Centre for Classification in Health, Australia; CM - Clinical Modification; AM - Australian Modification
      DescriptionICD-10 & ICD-10-AMComments
      All Circulatory Diseases I00-I99, Excluding I84 All records are included, NSW residents only, all ages.
      Coronary heart disease I20-I25
      Heart failure I50
      Peripheral vascular disease I70-I74
      Stroke I60-I64
      Haemorrhoids. This type is not included in the Total of circulatory diseases.

      I84 up to 2012/13

      K64 from 2013/14

      Transient ischaemic attacks. This type is not included in the Total of circulatory diseases. G45

      Transient ischaemic attacks (TIA) are a risk factor for strokes. TIA were classified as diseases of circulatory system in ICD-9-CM (with the exception of amaurosis fugax, which has always been classified with nervous system group; ICD-9: 362.34, ICD10: G45.4). In ICD-10-AM, they are classified with the diseases of nervous system (G codes) and, consequently, are not included in the stroke count and in the total of diseases of circulatory system (i.e. cardiovascular diseases, I codes).

      Haemorrhoids were classified as diseases of the circulatory system under ICD-10-AM Seventh edition (I84). In ICD-10-AM Eighth edition haemorrhoids are classified with diseases of the digestive system (K64). Consequently, haemorrhoids are not included in the total count of diseases of circulatory system.

      Care should be taken when comparing data from different sources as only an intracranial haemorrhage (I60-I62) is considered a stroke in some reports while haemorrhage (I60-I62), cerebral infarction (I63) and stroke not specified as haemorrhage or infarction (I64) are included in this report.

  • + Related Indicators
  • + Associated Information
    • Key points: Circulatory disease

      • Circulatory diseases cause more than 15,000 deaths and 150,000 hospitalisations of NSW residents in each year. Coronary heart disease and atrial fibrillation and flutter contribute the most to these diseases' hospitalisation burden, followed by heart failure and strokes.

      • Death rates, and numbers of deaths, from circulatory disease are consistently higher in males than in females. Death rates are higher in Inner regional, Outer regional and Remote areas of NSW than in Major cities.

      • Death rates from all forms of circulatory disease have more than halved in the last twenty years after adjusting for population ageing. This is due to both:

        • decreased incidence, associated with reductions in some risk factors, including smoking, saturated fats in the diet, and levels of blood pressure;

        • increased survival, as a result of improvements in medical and surgical treatment and follow-up care.

      • Coronary heart disease caused 5,928 deaths in 2017. Coronary heart disease was the principal reason for 46,602 hospitalisations in NSW in 2017-18.

      • Stroke caused just over 2,803 deaths in NSW in 2017. Stroke was the principal reason for 13,093 hospitalisations in NSW in 2017-18.

      • Heart failure was the underlying cause of 1,116 deaths in NSW in 2017 and was a contributing cause in many more. Heart failure was the principal reason for 17,543 hospitalisations in NSW in 2017-18.

      • In the treatment of coronary heart disease, the number of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PCTA) procedures (with and without stents) first exceeded the number of the more invasive coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) procedures in 2000-01. More than 15,000 PCTAs were performed in 2017-18, more than three times as many as CABGs at around 4,000 procedures.

    • Introduction: Circulatory disease

      Definitions

      Cardiovascular (or circulatory) diseases comprise all diseases of the heart and blood vessels. Among these diseases, the four types responsible for the most deaths in NSW are: coronary heart disease (or ischaemic heart disease), stroke (or cerebrovascular disease), heart failure, and peripheral vascular disease. Other causes of death are cardiac arrhythmias (most notably atrial fibrillation), heart valve disorders, non-ischaemic cardiomyopathies, pulmonary embolism, and hypertensive renal and heart disease. Significant causes of morbidity include hypertension, deep vein thrombosis, haemorrhoids and varicose veins.

      Burden of disease

      Cardiovascular diseases accounted for 14% of the total disease burden in Australia in 2015, second only to cancers. The burden from cardiovascular diseases was predominantly fatal (78.5%) with only 21.5% due to non-fatal burden. Coronary (ischaemic) heart disease ranked highest in total individual disease burden (6.9% of the total burden) and stroke ranked ninth highest (2.7% of the total disease burden). 

      Presently, cardiovascular diseases account for around 48,000 deaths in Australia (around 33-34% of all deaths), more than any other group of diseases. This proportion has been in decline since 1970, when nationally cardiovascular diseases were responsible for over half of all deaths.

      Risk factors

      The four major causes of death from cardiovascular disease share a number of behavioural risk factors (tobacco smoking, physical inactivity, poor diet, risky alcohol consumption) leading to physiological risk factors (high blood pressure, elevated blood lipids, diabetes mellitus, and overweight or obesity).

      References

      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare 2019. Australian Burden of Disease Study: Impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2015. Australian Burden of Disease Study series no. 19. BOD 22. Canberra: AIHW at: https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/burden-of-disease/burden-disease-study-illness-death-2015-summary/contents/table-of-contents

    • Interventions: Circulatory diseases and Preventive Health

      Circulatory diseases share many modifiable risk factors with other lifestyle-related chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. These include smoking, physical inactivity, poor diet, harmful alcohol consumption and being overweight. This means that strategies related to the prevention, early detection and optimal management of these risk factors will lead to better health outcomes for people with circulatory diseases and other lifestyle-related chronic diseases.

      Information on NSW Health programs and policies is available at http://www.health.nsw.gov.au/healthyliving/Pages/default.aspx.

    • For more information: Circulatory disease

      Useful websites

      National Heart Foundation of Australia at https://www.heartfoundation.org.au

      Australian Bureau of Statistics at http://www.abs.gov.au

      Australian Institute of Health and Welfare at http://www.aihw.gov.au

      healthdirect at http://www.healthdirect.gov.au

Last Updated At: Tuesday, 10 September 2019