HealthStats NSW

Topic

Back to all topics Aboriginal health Alcohol Antenatal care Asthma Burden of disease Cardiovascular disease Communicable diseases Coronary heart disease Country of birth Diabetes Drug misuse Environment Falls Health-related behaviours Immunisation Influenza Injury and poisoning Life expectancy Low birth weight Mental health Mothers and babies Nutrition Oral health Overview of deaths Overview of hospitalisations Overweight or obesity Physical activity Population Population health performance indicators Potentially avoidable deaths Potentially preventable hospitalisations Pregnancy and the newborn period Psychological distress Respiratory disease Rural and remote populations Sexually transmissible infections Smoking Social determinants Socioeconomic status Stroke Suicide Vaccine preventable diseases

Group

Acute respiratory infection hospitalisations Aged pension, disability and sickness benefits Alcohol attributable deaths Alcohol attributable hospitalisations Alcohol attributable injury hospitalisations Alcohol drinking frequency in adults Alcohol drinking in adults Antenatal care by gestational age Asthma deaths Asthma hospitalisations Asthma prevalence in adults Babies in NSW Baby condition at birth: Apgar score Baby discharge status Birth weight Breast cancer Burn injury hospitalisations Cervical cancer Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease deaths Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease hospitalisations by age Circulatory disease deaths Circulatory disease deaths by disease type Circulatory disease hospitalisations Circulatory disease hospitalisations by disease type Circulatory disease procedures by type Colorectal cancer Coronary heart disease hospitalisations by age Coronary revascularisation procedures Current smoking in adults Deaths by category of cause Deaths from all causes Dementia hospitalisations Dental status of children Diabetes as principal diagnosis: hospitalisations Diabetes hospitalisations by type of diabetes and age Diabetes prevalence in adults Diabetes-related deaths Duration of pregnancy at birth (gestational age) Excellent, very good and good self rated health in adults Fall-related hospitalisations Fall-related injury hospitalisations Fertility rates Food insecurity Fruit and vegetables: recommended daily consumption by adults Gastrointestinal infection hospitalisations High blood pressure attributable hospitalisations High blood pressure in adults High body mass attributable deaths High body mass attributable hospitalisations High cholesterol in adults High or very high psychological distress in adults Hospitalisations by category of cause Hospitalisations for all causes Immediate risk alcohol drinking in adults Individual weekly income Infant feeding at discharge by type of feeding Infant mortality Influenza and pneumococcal disease immunisation Influenza and pneumonia deaths Influenza and pneumonia hospitalisations Injury and poisoning deaths Injury and poisoning deaths by leading cause Injury and poisoning hospitalisations Injury and poisoning hospitalisations by leading cause Intentional self-harm: hospitalisations Interpersonal-violence–related deaths Interpersonal-violence–related hospitalisations Labour onset Life expectancy Low birth weight babies Lung cancer Maternal age Maternal medical conditions Melanoma cancer Mesothelioma Methamphetamine-related Hospitalisations Mothers in NSW Motor vehicle crash deaths Motor vehicle crash hospitalisations Number of previous pregnancies: Parity Oral health hospitalisations by reason for hospitalisation Overweight and obesity in adults Perinatal mortality Physical activity in adults Place of birth Population by age Population by remoteness from service centres Potentially avoidable deaths Potentially preventable hospitalisations by category Potentially preventable hospitalisations by condition Preterm births Prevalence of falls in the elderly Prostate cancer Psychological distress by Kessler 10 categories Removal and restoration of teeth for dental caries Respiratory disease deaths by disease type Respiratory diseases hospitalisations Skin infection hospitalisations Smoke-free cars Smoke-free households Smoking attributable deaths Smoking attributable hospitalisations Smoking in pregnancy Smoking status categories Stroke hospitalisations Suicide Type of birth (vaginal, caesarean, forceps etc)

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  • + Key points: Rural and remote populations

    • Across Australia, people living in rural and remote areas generally have worse health than those living in cities.

    • Reasons for this health differential include geographic isolation, socioeconomic disadvantage, shortage of health care providers, lower levels of access to health services, greater exposure to injury risks, and poor health among Aboriginal people who comprise a significant proportion of the population in rural and remote areas.

    • The population of NSW is highly urbanised. Less than 1% of the total population lived in areas classified as Remote or Very remote in 2014.

    • In 2014 around 39,000 residents in NSW lived in Remote or Very remote areas of the state.

    • Compared with people who live in Major cities, and based on death data up to 2013 and hospitalisations data up to 2013-14, people who live in Remote or Very remote areas:

    • are more likely to die prematurely, and from causes classified as ‘potentially avoidable’

    • are more likely to be hospitalised for conditions for which hospitalisation can be avoided through prevention and early management

    • are more likely to be overweight and obese

    • are more likely to die in motor vehicle crashes

    • are more likely to be hospitalised for heart disease.

  • + Background: Rural and remote populations

    Definitions

    The Australian Statistical Geography Standard (ASGS) defines five categories of remoteness based on the distance travelled by road to a major service centre. The service centres are defined by population size and the cut-offs for each category are reviewed following each five-yearly Census of Population and Housing. The remoteness categories are: Major cities, Inner regional, Outer regional, Remote and Very remote areas. The term rural and remote is used when referring generally to all areas outside of Major cities.

    Demography

    The population of NSW is highly urbanised. In 2014, just under 26% of the total population lived in rural and remote areas of NSW and an estimated 0.5% of the population lived in areas classified as Remote or Very remote, according to the ASGS categories. The ASGS categories and ARIA classification are discussed further under the Methods tab.

    Aboriginal people make up an increasing proportion of the population with increasing remoteness, and comprise over 40% of the population of Very remote areas and just under a quarter of residents in Remote and Very remote areas combined. However, less than 5% of the total Aboriginal population in NSW live in Remote or Very remote areas, with almost 45% living in Major cities in NSW.

    Burden of disease

    Across Australia, people living in rural and remote areas have worse health generally than those living in metropolitan areas. Numerous factors contribute to this differential but many originate in geographic isolation and include socioeconomic disadvantage, shortage of health care providers, lower levels of access to health services and greater exposure to injury risks. The main factor, however, is poorer health among Aboriginal people who comprise a significant proportion of the population in rural and remote areas.

  • + Interventions: Rural and remote populations

    NSW Health Rural Health Plan: Towards 2021

    The NSW Rural Health Plan: Towards 2021, launched on 7 November 2014, aims to strengthen the capacity of NSW rural health services to provide connected and seamless care. The Plan builds on the significant achievements made to date in rural health services, aiming to provide world class care as close to home as possible for people living in rural NSW.